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I/O

Blazar: another pill to relieve Asyncmania

I’ve been ranting already about today’s non-thread-blocking needs (here: Efficient I/O: working smart with slow byte movers) and the fact that some of the most prominent runtimes (e.g. JVM…) lack support for fibers, causing everyone to shelter in asynchronous programming models instead of looking for ways to complement the runtime. Actually Ron Pressler has been writing about this issue quite extensively in Parallel Universe’s blog , for example a very fine post is Little’s Law, Scalability and Fault Tolerance: The OS is your bottleneck (and what you can do about it) but I warmly recommend reading everything in there as there’s a lot of insight and great architectural and even day-to-day suggestions are provided. Let me call this syndrome …

Efficient I/O: working smart with slow byte movers

These days I feel deeply puzzled with (not to say troubled by) a few aspects of our contemporary software architecture & development machinery. There’s a lot of gossiping going on about efficient runtime & programming models in the context of contemporary operating systems’ support for so-called “non-blocking I/O” (read: vert.x, node.js, netty & the like), which basically means “tell what you’re interested in and where, then I’ll call you back so you don’t have to stand up waiting for a slow guy like I am”. Actually, some smart people got the topic right in a clever way long time before this trend started to get hot: they are the Erlang guys. …